O’Dea Air Force Base

In August, 2007, Aer Lingus chief executive Dermot Mannion announced that it is to cease direct flights between Shannon Airport and Heathrow Airport.

The announcement comes amid growing numbers of U.S. Military Flights through Shannon Regional Airport.

Willie O’Dea (TD) was appointed Minister for Defence in September 2004. He is the local representative for Limerick and although O’Dea has publicly complained at the Aer Lingus decision, it has come to light that he had prior knowledge of the plan to end the Shannon – Heathrow route.

It has emerged through the leak of a highly sensitive Department of Defence document this week that the ceasing of flights by Aer Lingus is the first of many to come. The leaked memo details a program of cessation of civilian flights from the Shannon air hub. This reduction in civilian flights is to coincide with an increase in military flight activity culminating in the closing of Shannon airport to all civilian flights in May, 2009. In June 2009 O’Dea A.F.B. will be opened at the location of Shannon Airport once the necessary security measures have been put in place.

Pictured below is Wille O’Dea (TD) Minister for Defence, at a Press Conference to announce the renaming of Shannon Airport to O’Dea A.F.B. in his honour.

O’Dea

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Vaseline, the Miracle Product

Robert Chesebrough (1837-1933), a British-born chemist who invented petroleum jelly, which he named Vaseline.

When he first invented the product he found it very difficult to convince stores and chemist shops to stock it. It was only his own determination and belief in the product that brought him success. Chesebrough travelled around New York State demonstrating his product. In front of large audiences he would burn his skin with acid or an open flame and then spread the clear jelly on his injuries. He displayed his past injuries which he claimed were healed by his “miracle” product.

He was so convinced of the curative powers of his petroleum jelly product he ate a spoonful of it nearly every day.

Vaseline

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Soft Toys

Scientists in Hamburg have recently completed an extensive stint of research on the cuteness of different animals. German toy manufacturer, Simba Toys GmbH & Co., commissioned the research ahead of the development of their new range of soft toys. The researched involved a survey of one thousand women between the ages of 16 and 35. Scientists studied their behaviour and brain activity when stimulated by pictures of various cute animals to determine the “awwwwh” factor.

Stuffed animals: teddy bears, tigers, puppies, penguins, pandas etc. have been around for hundreds of years. The use of stuffed animals as soft toys is a relatively new phenomenon. Taxidermy was used in Mesopotamian civilization for religious purposes. Later, taxidermy was used by hunters and statesmen to show their success and male prowess. The exact timescale for the move from taxidermy to soft toys is unknown.

Simba Toys GmbH & Co. plan to begin production of the new range in 2008, beginning with cute birds such as the duck.

 

Cute Seal Babies

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The Truth about Sudocrem

Sudocrem, the antiseptic healing cream used for nappy rash was originally called Sumocrem. The manufactures named the product Sumocrem because of the use of Peru Balsam.

The natural oils from Peru Balsam are recognised for their healing properties and have been used for centuries by Sumo Wrestlers to avoid chafing from the “mawashi”.

The Sumo Association of Japan (SAJ), the foremost governing body of Sumo Wrestling, took a class action against Forest Labs Inc. in 1965 to force them to drop the Sumocrem name. The SAJ argued that associating Sumo Wrestling with baby nappy rash was damaging to the sport’s reputation. Following lengthy legal arguments it was found that the name Sumocrem impeded on the Sumo brand, owned by the SAJ.

In early 1966 Forest Labs Inc. changed the name of the baby care product from Sumocrem to Sudocrem, the household name we know today.

 

Baboon

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Gillette – the best a man can get

King Camp Gillette was born in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin in 1855. He worked as a travelling salesman to support his young family.

On a morning in February 1895 Gillette had an almost fatal accident with a razor blade while shaving. He later told friends and family that, in the near death experience that followed, George Washington himself had told him to invent a safety razor for the good of the nation. Gillette said he had told President Washington that he would reach for the best a man can get. On November 15th, 1904, patent #775,134 was granted to King C. Gillette for a safety ‘razor’.

During World War I, the U.S. Government issued Gillette safety razors to the entire armed forces. By the end of the war, some 3.5 million razors and 32 million blades were put into military hands. Military chiefs said that the Gillette Safety Razor was a contributing factor in winning the war.

Not satisfied with the efficiency of the safety razor in keeping soldiers’ heads bald during World War I, U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel Jacob Schick invented the electric razor to speed up the process in 1924.

 

Hairy Legs

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George Washington came to King Camp Gillette in a dream and told him to invent a safety razor for the good of the nation.”

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Where Etiquette comes from

Etiquette is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as “the code of polite behaviour in society”.
Sir Robert Etiquette, knighted by Queen Mary I in March, 1556, was an eccentric English nobleman who owned a large portion of Cornwall in Southern England.
Sir Etiquette began a slide to insanity after his wife died in childbirth in June 1557. He insisted on ever stricter rules regarding the behaviour of others in his presence. First, he imposed these rules only on his servants, but later he also demanded that guests at his manor follow them, insisting they were needed for proper decorum.
After Sir Etiquette’s death in December 1567, King James I, a close personal friend of his, adopted the more mellow of his rules for use in the Royal Court. This led to a general acceptance of Sir Etiquette’s ideas, which formed the basis of modern day etiquette.

Picking Nose

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Operation Flying Rat

Homing Pigeon

Homing Pigeons, also known as messenger pigeons, were used as early as 1150 in Baghdad. They were used extensively during World War I, and one homing pigeon, “Cher Ami”, was awarded the French Croix de Guerre for his heroic service in delivering 12 important messages, despite being shot once.
A recently leaked C.I.A. memo, drawn up prior to “Operation Iraqi Freedom”, detailed the dangers posed by Messenger Pigeons. The memo highlighted United States Government fears that Messenger Pigeons could evade detection by conventional means.

It was feared that the Iraqi Republican Guard would deploy highly trained war-pigeons to circumvent the detection systems employed by the U.S. Military. Satellites, data screeners and other hi-tech assets would all be rendered useless.
The recommendations of the report led to 14 million dollars of U.S. taxpayers’ money being spent on “Operation Flying Rat” – a counter-pigeon exercise that included the modification of U.S. Military Spy Drones.

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